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Bedroom damp caused by poor air circulation

Left untreated, damp can be bad for both your health (the mould and spores can aggravate respiratory problems such as asthma) and the health of your property: If any form of damp is left unchecked it can cause a number of potentially serious issues, including damage to decorated surfaces, or timber decay and even wet rot, which can lead to structural deterioration, and may necessitate major repair costs. More »

Penetrating damp in brickwork can cause major wall instabilities

Whether it’s damp proofing walls to prevent penetrating damp, treating rising damp, or dealing with condensation problems, damp proofing costs needn’t be prohibitive, though selecting the appropriate treatment will depend on the results of the damp survey. More »

Deep wall damp can be almost hidden behind plastering and wall paper

Penetrating damp: Once the source of the water ingress has been identified and repaired, treatments such as silicone water repellents, bitumen coatings, or a waterproof membrane can be applied to guard against future damp problems. More »

Brickwork affected by damp can cause serious problems for your home

Rising damp: Specialist creams are injected into the brickwork to form a waterproof barrier at the base of the wall; this will prevent water rising and penetrating into the building. Once the brickwork has dried out, the interior walls are re-plastered with plaster containing a waterproof additive. More »

 

Damp Proofing


FAQs for damp proofingAnyone who’s ever experienced a British ‘summer’ knows that the UK is a wet country, so it’s perhaps no surprise that

damp can be one of the biggest problems in any age of house. And while there’s nothing to be done about the weather, obtaining expert advice from a damp proofing specialist can at least prevent damp problems from affecting us when we’re inside our homes.

What is damp?

Put simply, the term ‘damp’ refers to FREE Rising Damp Help & Advice Packthe presence of unwanted moisture in the structure of a building. Every building exposed to the elements can suffer from damp, whether it’s penetrating damp (perhaps due to blocked guttering or cracked pipework, or caused by a missing tile or cracked render), rising damp (where the damp course is either faulty or,   in some cases, non-existent, meaning water is being ‘sucked’ up from the ground into the fabric of the building), or condensation problems (perhaps caused by insufficient ventilation).

Left untreated, damp can be bad for both your health (the mould and spores can aggravate respiratory problems such as asthma) and the health of your property: If any form of damp is left unchecked it can cause a number of potentially serious issues, including damage to decorated surfaces, or timber decay and even wet rot, which can lead to structural deterioration, and may necessitate major repair costs.

If you suspect your home might be experiencing damp problems, a damp proofing specialist should be your first port of call. They’ll conduct a damp survey to determine the cause and severity of the damp, as it’s only when both these factors have been accurately identified that any damp problems can be effectively treated, the damage repaired correctly, and any recurrence prevented through proper damp proofing.

How is damp proofing achieved?

Whether it’s damp proofing walls to prevent penetrating damp, treating rising damp, or dealing with condensation problems, damp proofing costs needn’t be prohibitive, though selecting the appropriate treatment will depend on the results of the damp survey.

Penetrating damp: Once the source of the water ingress has been identified and repaired, treatments such as silicone water repellents, bitumen coatings, or a waterproof membrane can be applied to guard against future damp problems.

Rising damp: Specialist creams are injected into the brickwork to form a waterproof barrier at the base of the wall; this will prevent water rising and penetrating into the building. Once the brickwork has dried out, the interior walls are re-plastered with plaster containing a waterproof additive.

Condensation: Sources of excess moisture are removed (for example, indoor drying of clothes). Additionally, the problem can be treated by the installation of passive ventilation units or dehumidifiers, or insulation of cold surfaces. Condensation problems can also be kept at bay by improving heating, and anti-fungal applications will help eradicate any mould.

Once treated, the affected room can then be redecorated.